FAQ’s:

Does my son have to go on every campout? No, there are no requirements that a Scout has to make a certain number of campouts, although camping is a big part of the Boy Scout experience.

Does a parent have to go on the campouts? Several adults will accompany the troop and we always work to provide enough transportation for all the Scouts who want to go on the campouts. It is a big departure from Cub Scouts, but parents are not required to go with their son. Gaining the ability to rely on their own skills, cook, pitch tents and even perform “kitchen patrol” is a big part of Scouting. Any parent is invited to attend and join the fun and enjoy the adult gourmet fare. For obvious reasons, adults camp/tent separately from the Scouts but usually within earshot and eyesight.

Does my son have to go to summer camp? No. But, these are unique experiences that create lifelong memories for your son (and you if you can go) and provide great opportunity for advancement. Scouts who attend summer camp their first year in Scouting typically get a big jump on advancement and historically tend to bond with the Scouting program for years to come.

What equipment does my son need? Each Scout will eventually need a backpack, sleeping bag and a good ground cushion/mattress (e.g. ThermaRest). Many Scouts buy a small lightweight tent that they can easily set up themselves.

How to Join Troop 229:  To join Boy Scouts, you must have completed the fifth grade, or be 11 years old, or have earned the Arrow of Light Award (Cub Scouts), but be younger than 18 years old. Come and visit a troop meeting or join us on a campout. You can just show up at a meeting or contact our Scoutmaster to arrange to come on a campout.

Webelos den leaders interested in visiting a Troop 229 meeting or joining us on a campout should contact the Scoutmaster.

If you wish to join Troop 229, all you need to do is come to a meeting with your parent or guardian, fill out an application, complete a Code of Conduct agreement and pay your annual dues. Troop 229’s dues for 2014 are expected to be $100 per year with Boy’s Life monthly magazine included. 

We encourage all parents to be active in our Scouting program. Parents are encouraged to register as adult leaders with BSA if you plan even a minimal level of participation in the troop. All parents are asked to make some time contribution to the troop during the year. There are many opportunities that parents can help out in planning individual activities, becoming a merit badge counselor for a specific merit badge or filling one of the adult leadership roles in the troop.

The Scout handbook, 229 numerals, neckerchief, slide and the epaulets for the uniform will be provided by the troop when you submit your completed membership form, a completed Code of Conduct form, and pay your dues. A “class-B” uniform can be purchased from the troop.

When you join the troop, you will be assigned to an older Scout whose job is to guide you through your early Scout ranks. If you have already studied the requirements for becoming a scout (e.g. Webelos) you can probably earn your Scout rank at your first meeting. 

Youth Online Application BSA Youth Application

Adult Online Application BSA Adult Application

 

Words To Live By

 

The Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best
to do my duty, to God and my country;
To obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong, mentally
awake, and morally straight.

The Scout Law

A Scout is
Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly,
Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful,
Thrifty, Brave, Clean, and Reverent.

The Scout Motto

Be Prepared!

The Scout Slogan

Do a Good Turn Daily

The Outdoor Code

As an American, I will do my best to --
Be clean in my outdoor manners,
Be careful with fire,
Be considerate in the outdoors, and
Be conservation-minded.

Campout Gear List


Required:
  • Backpack (troop loaners available)
  • Tent (share with one or more scouts)
  • Sleeping bag (in a stuff sack)
  • Mess kit (bowl and/or plate, fork and/or spoon)
  • 2 1-liter water bottles
  • Change of clothes
  • Toiletries (tooth brush/paste, soap, toilet paper, hand sanitizer)
  • Rain gear
  • Flashlight and/or headlamp
  • Personal first aid kit
  • Whistle
  • Sunscreen
  • Scout Handbook
  • $10 for Sunday lunch on the way home
Cold Weather:
  • Fleece or knit stocking cap
  • Gloves
  • Hand warmers (air activated packs)
  • Dry clothing for sleeping, e.g. long underwear, wool socks
  • Wicking base layer (non-cotton to wick away sweat)
  • Chapstick/Lip balm
Optional:
  • Day pack or fanny pack (for day hikes)
  • Sleeping pad
  • Pocket knife (with your Toten Chip)
  • Fire starter (firesteel, magnesium, tinder, etc; with your Firem'n Chit)
  • Compass
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Bug spray
  • Work gloves (for service projects)
  • Binoculars
  • 2-way radio (channel 4, subchannel 10)
  • Pencil and paper
  • Playing cards, board games, frisbee, football
Water Activity:
  • Swim suit & towel
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD)
  • Swim shirt (fast drying)
  • Fishing gear
Backpacking:  (when backpacking without chuck boxes, each patrol needs to pack their own cooking gear)
  • Backpacking stove and fuel; 1 for every 2-4 scouts (propane/butane, white gas, alcohol)
    • All liquid fuels must be in well-marked approved containers, transported and stored by an adult, and used under an adult's supervision
  • Dining fly (tarp used as a rain fly for the cooking and eating area)
  • 1 quart pot (to boil water for cooking)
  • Freezer bags for "cooking"
  • Trash bags (pack it in, pack it out)
  • All gear should fit in or be strapped on to the backpack
What not to bring:
  • Personal electronics are not allowed on campouts, but may be used in the cars while traveling
  • Closed toe shoes are required for all Scout activities - no sandals
  • No personal food or snacks;  The grubmaster should provide all the food for the patrol
  • No food in backpacks or tents (to keep the critters away)

Gear Deals

ALPS Mountaineering
     Manufacturer of good quality gear at lower costs
     http://www.scoutdirect.com (45% discount for scouts)
     http://www.alpsmountaineering.com (selection)

Coleman 
     http://www.coleman.com/coleman/home.asp

REI Outlet
    
Online only discounts on REI gear
     http://www.rei.com/outlet

Sierra Trading Post
     http://www.sierratradingpost.com

GearTrade.com
    
Deals on used, closeouts and overstock
     http://www.geartrade.com

Backcountry
     http://www.backcountry.com

Campmor
     http://www.campmor.com


What to buy

Tent
2-person; REI half dome is very popular; Single wall tents are not recommended due to condensation problems

Sleeping Bag
20 degree; Mummy style is lighter and packs easier

Sleeping Pad
1" to 2" self inflating;

Backpack
Philmont recommends a minimum of 4,000 cu in for externals and 4,500 for internals.
Externals are less expensive, tend to be lighter and allow more air flow around your back.  They are good for open flat hiking.
Internals fit closer to your body and are more maneuverable on uneven terrain and don't snag on tree limbs and brush.
Positions of Responsibility

Boy Scout troop

A Boy Scout troop is a small democracy. With the Scoutmaster’s guidance, Scouts form themselves into patrols, plan the troop’s program, and bring it to life. For that to happen, a troop relies upon Scouts serving in positions of responsibility. The key youth leaders of the troop make up the patrol leaders’ council (PLC).

Patrol Leader's Council

The patrol leaders’ council plans and runs the troop’s program and activities and gives long-range direction with an annual planning meeting that lays out the troop’s calendar for the year. The PLC also meets each month to fine-tune upcoming troop meetings and activities. They get together for a few moments after each troop meeting to review the plans for the next troop meeting and make any adjustments to ensure its success.

The senior patrol leader conducts meetings of the PLC. Patrol leaders present the ideas and concerns of their patrols, help develop the troop’s overall program, and then take the council’s decisions to the rest of the troop members.

The Scoutmaster attends PLC meetings as a coach and an informational resource. As much as possible, he allows the Scouts to run the meetings and make the decisions, stepping in with suggestions and guidance when that will enhance the program for the troop, the patrols, and individuals. The Scoutmaster retains veto power over decisions of the council but should need to exercise it only on rare occasions when the plans of the PLC would violate BSA policy or could lead to a situation that might jeopardize the safety and well-being of troop members.

 

Senior Patrol Leader
The senior patrol leader (SPL) is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top youth leader in the troop. He runs all troop meetings, events, activities, the annual program planning conference, and the patrol leaders' council meeting. He appoints other troop youth leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster.

Summary of a Senior Patrol Leader Duties:

  • Run all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference.
  • Chair meetings of the patrol leaders’ council.
  • Appoint troop members to serve in the troop’s other junior leader positions (with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster).
  • Delegate duties and responsibilities to other junior leaders.
  • Assist the Scoutmaster with troop junior leader training.
  • Set a good example.
  • Wear the Scout uniform correctly.
  • Show Scout spirit.
Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
The assistant senior patrol leader (ASPL) is the second highest-ranking youth leader in the troop. He should be a strong ally for the senior patrol leader, someone who can be relied upon to help the troop move forward. The troop can use him as a sounding board when tough decisions must be made. His duties include:

  • Train and provide direction to the troop quartermaster, scribe, historian, librarian, instructors, and Order of the Arrow representative.
  • Take charge of the troop whenever the senior patrol leader is not available
  • Provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop.

Patrol Leader
The patrol leader is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders’ council and appoints the assistant patrol leader.
Troop Guide
The troop guide works with new Scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class in their first year. He teaches basic Scout skills and works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings.

Other troop leadership positions

Assistant Patrol Leader
The assistant patrol leader is appointed by the patrol leader and leads the patrol in his absence. He represents his patrol at patrol leaders’ council meetings when the patrol leader cannot attend. The assistant patrol leader position does not count towards leadership requirements for Star, Life, or Eagle.
Quartermaster
The quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order. He keeps records on patrol and troop equipment, makes sure equipment is in good working condition, and issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition. (Appointed by the SPL)
Scribe
The scribe keeps the troop records. He records the activities of the patrol leaders’ council and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings. (Appointed by the SPL)
Historian
The historian preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia. (Appointed by the SPL)
Librarian
The librarian oversees the care and use of troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor lists. (Appointed by the SPL)
Instructor
The instructor teaches Scouting skills.
Chaplain Aide
The chaplain aide works with the troop chaplain to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. (Appointed by the SPL)
Den Chief
The den chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack. Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks and encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation.
Junior Assistant Scoutmaster
The junior assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) serves in the capacity of an assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He is appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability.
Order of the Arrow Representative
The Order of the Arrow Representative is a youth liaison serving between the local Order of the Arrow (OA) lodge or chapter and his troop. In his unit, he helps meet the needs of the unit and will serve as a communication and programmatic link to and from Arrowmen, adult leaders and Scouts who are not presently members of the Order. (Appointed by the SPL)
Webmaster
The troop webmaster is responsible for maintaining the troop’s website. He should make sure that information posted on the website is correct and up to date and that members’ and leaders’ privacy is protected. A member of the troop committee may assist him with his work. 
Leave No Trace Trainer
The Leave No Trace Trainer specializes in teaching Leave No Trace principles and ensuring that the troop follows these principles on outings. He can also help Scouts earn the Leave No Trace award. He should have a thorough understanding of and commitment to Leave No Trace. Ideally, he should have completed Leave No Trace training and earned the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges.
Bugler
The Bugler should be able to make appropriate bugle calls, as requested, at troop activities. (Appointed by the SPL) Serving as Bugler can apply towards Positions of Responsibility requirements for Star and Life but not Eagle.
Musician
Boy Scouts or Venturers who are members of bands, drill teams, or drum and bugle corps affiliated with a unit or a local council may also wear the musician badge special insignia.
Ranks requiring a Positions of Responsibility

Positions of Responsibility

 

SPL | ASPL | Quartermaster | Scribe | Troop Guide | Instructor | Bugler | Librarian | Historian | Webmaster | Leave No Trace Trainer | OA Rep | Den Chief | Chaplain Aide | JASM | PL | APL

 

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL)

Job Description:

The Senior Patrol Leader is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top junior leader in the troop.
Reports to: Scoutmaster

Senior Patrol Leader duties:

  • Preside at all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference.
  • Chair the Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meeting once a month.
  • Appointed other boy leaders with the advice and consent of the Scoutmaster.
  • Assign duties and responsibilities to other junior leaders.
  • Assists with Scoutmaster in training junior leaders.
  • Delegates task to the ASPLs. Makes sure an ASPL attends any meeting/function he will not be able to attend (Troop Meeting, PLC, Committee Meeting, campout/outing etc.)
  • Oversees the planning efforts of Scouts for all Troop campouts (whether he attends these outing or not).

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL)

Job Description:

The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader is the second highest-ranking junior leader in the Troop. He is elected by the troop membership to serve a six-month term as ASPL, then serves a second six-month term as SPL. The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader acts as the Senior Patrol Leader in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader or when called upon. He also provides leadership to other junior leaders in the Troop.
Reports to: Senior Patrol Leader

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader duties:

  • Help with leading meetings and activities as called upon by the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Take over troop leadership in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Be responsible for training and giving direct leadership to the following appointed junior leaders: Scribe, Librarian, Troop Historian, Instructor, Quartermaster and Chaplain Aide.
  • Perform tasks assigned by the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Serves as a member of the Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC).

Troop Quartermaster

Job Description:

The Troop Quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Troop Quartermaster duties:

  • Keep records on patrol and troop equipment.
  • Keep equipment in good repair.
  • Issue equipment and see that it is returned in good order.
  • Suggest new or replacement items.
  • Work with the troop committee member responsible for equipment.

Troop Scribe

Job Description:

The Troop Scribe keeps the troop records. He records the activities of the Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Troop Scribe duties:

  • Attend and keep a log of Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) Meetings and distributes copies to PLC Members and Adult Leaders.
  • Record attendance at troop functions.
  • Record advancement in troop records.
  • Work with the troop committee member responsible for finance, records, and advancement.

Troop Guide

Job Description:

To work actively with new Scouts in the Baden-Powell program. The Troop Guides introduce new Scouts to troop operations and helps them feel comfortable in the troop.
Reports to: The Assistant Scoutmaster of the New Scout Patrol

Troop Guide duties:

  • Help new Scouts earn advancement requirements through First Class.
  • Advise patrol leader on his duties and responsibilities at Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meetings.
  • Attend Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) meetings with the New Scout Patrol Leader.
  • Prevent harassment of new Scouts by older Scouts.
  • Help Assistant Scoutmaster train new Scouts by older Scouts.
  • Guide new Scouts through early troop experiences to help them become comfortable in the troop and the outdoors.
  • Teach basic Scout skills.

Instructor

Job Description:

The Instructor teaches scouting skills.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Instructor duties:

  • Instruct Scouting skills as needed within the troop or patrols.
  • Prepare well in advance for each teaching assignment.

Bugler

Job Description:

The Bugler plays the bugle at troop ceremonies.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Bugler duties:

  • Plays bugle as requested by troop leadership.
  • Plays taps during evening closing ceremony.

Librarian

Job Description:

The Librarian takes care of troop literature.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Librarian duties:

  • Establish and take care of the troop library.
    - Keep records on literature owned by the troop.
    - Add new or replacement items as needed.
    - Keep books and pamphlets available for borrowing at troop meetings.
    - Keep a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out.
    - Follow up on late returns.
  • Show Scout spirit.

Historian

Job Description:

The Historian keeps a historical record or scrapbook of troop activities.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Historian duties:

  • Gather pictures and facts about past troop activities and keeps them in scrapbooks, wall displays or informational ( historical ) files.
  • Take care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities.
  • Provide reports about troop campouts and activities to Troop Newsletter Editor and WebMaster.
  • Keep information about former members of the troop.
  • Show Scout spirit.

Webmaster

Job Description:

Reports to: Senior Patrol Leader

Webmaster duties:

  • Maintain Troop Website.
  • Update Troop Website in a timely manner.
  • Work with Patrols on developing Website content.
  • Work with Troop Historian and Scribe on maintaining information on Troop Information.
  • Work with Scoutmaster and Troop Committee Chair on Website content.

Leave No Trace Trainer

Job Description:

Reports to: Senior Patrol Leader

Leave No Trace Trainer Duties:

  • Youth must have completed the 16 hour Leave No Trace Trainer Course approved by the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics and the Boy Scouts of America, from any recognized Leave No Trace Master Educator PRIOR TO ASSUMING THE POSITION.
  • Age: The BSA Leave No Trace Trainer Course Manual restricts training to youth ages 14 and higher. Youth who have completed the required training would be eligible -if they can do the job.
  • Eligible youth must exhibit a high degree of maturity and responsibility to successfully complete the training and before assuming the position.
  • For youth who are not old enough or cannot find a Trainer Course, the Task force recommends that the Senior Patrol Leader and Scoutmaster consider appointing them an instructor. For Instructors, the Task force recommends, but it is not required, that the youth go through the BSA Leave No Trace 101 Course. This is a three hour intensive, hands-on work shop conducted by any recognized Leave No Trace Trainer or Master Educator.
  • Job Description: The Leave No Trace Trainer teaches troop and patrol members the principles of Leave No Trace, improves Scouts' outdoor ethics decision making skills, and helps the troop and patrol to prevent avoidable impacts and minimize unavoidable impacts from their use of the outdoors. The senior patrol leader may appoint a Scout who has successfully completed the 16-hour minimum nationally recognized Leave No Trace Trainer training course to serve as a Leave No Trace Trainer. A Scout who has not completed Leave No Trace Trainer training may serve as an Instructor teaching Leave No Trace skills until he obtains the necessary training.
  • Recognition: New Leave No Trace Trainer position of responsibility patch presented upon completion of the Trainer Course (See patch above); a certificate of recognition as a Leave No Trace Trainer by the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, and the LNT Trainer patch,

OA Troop Representative

Job Description:

An Order of the Arrow Troop Representative is a youth liaison serving between the local OA lodge or chapter and his troop. In his troop, he serves as a communication and programmatic link to the Arrowman and adult leaders and Scouts who are not presently members of the Order. He does this in a fashion that strengthens the mission of the lodge and purpose of the Order. By setting a good example, he enhances the image of the Order as a service arm to his troop.
Reports to: The Senior Patrol Leader

OA Troop Representative duties:

  • Serves as a communication link between the lodge or chapter and the troop.
  • Encourages year round and resident camping in the troop.
  • Encourages older Scout participation in high adventure programs.
  • Encourages Scouts to actively participate in community service projects.
  • Assists with leadership skills training in the troop.
  • Encourages Arrowmen to assume leadership positions in the troop.
  • Encourages Arrowmen in the troop to be active participants in the lodge and/or chapter activities and to seal their membership in the Order by becoming Brotherhood members.

OA Troop Representative Qualifications:

  • Under 18 years old
  • Appointed by SPL with SM approval
  • OA Member in good standing

Den Chief (optional)

Job Description:

The Den Chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack.
Reports to: The Den Leader in the pack and the Assistant Scoutmaster for the New Scout Patrol in the troop.

Den Chief duties:

  • Serve as the activities assistant at den meetings.
  • Meet regularly with the Den Leader to review the den and pack meeting plans.
  • If serving as a Webelos Den Chief, prepare boys to join Boy Scouting.
  • Project a positive image of Boy Scouting.
  • Know the purposes of Cub Scouting.
  • Encourage Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation.
  • Help out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings.
  • Be a friend to the boys in the den.
  • Live by Scout Oath and Law.

Chaplain Aide

Job Description:

The Chaplain Aide works with the Troop Chaplain to meet the religious needs of the Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program.
Reports to:the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (and works with the Chaplain)

Chaplain Aide duties:

  • Keep troop leader appraised of religious holidays when planning activities.
  • Assist Chaplain or religious coordinator in meeting the religious needs of troop members while on activities.
  • Encourage saying grace at meals while camping or on activities.
  • Tell Scouts about the religious emblem program of their faith.
  • Help plan for religious observance in troop activities.

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster(optional)

Job Description:

The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an Assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18 and be an Eagle Scout. He is appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his demonstrated leadership ability.
Reports to: The Scoutmaster

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster duties:

  • Function as an Assistant Scoutmaster (except for leadership responsibilities reserved for adults 18 and 21 years of age or older).
  • Accomplish any duties assigned by the Scoutmaster.
  • Attends at least 5/6 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.

Patrol Leader

Job Description:

The Patrol Leader is elected by the patrol and leads the patrol.
Reports to: The Senior Patrol Leader

Patrol Leader duties:

  • Plan and lead patrol meetings and activities.
  • Keep patrol members informed.
  • Assign each patrol member a job and help them succeed.
  • Represent the patrol at all Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meetings and at the annual program planning conference.
  • Prepares the patrol to take part in all troop activities.
  • Develop patrol spirit.
  • Work with other troop leaders to make the troop run well.
  • Know what patrol members and other leaders can do.
  • Set the example.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL)

Job Description:

The Assistant Patrol Leader is appointed by the Patrol Leader and leads the patrol in his absence.
Reports to: The Patrol Leader

Assistant Patrol Leader duties:

  • Assist the Patrol Leader in:
    - planning and leading patrol meetings and activities.
    - keeping patrol members informed.
    - preparing your patrol to take part in all troop activities.
  • and steer patrol meetings and activities
  • Take charge of the patrol in the absence of the Patrol Leader.
  • Represent the patrol at Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meetings in the absence of the Patrol Leader.
  • Work with the other troop leaders to make the troop run well.
  • Help develop patrol spirit.

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History:  Troop 229 was formed on February 28, 2009 with the crossing over of 5 boys from Pack 59. From that humble beginning the Troop has now grown to 24 registered scouts.

Advancement:  Troop 229 has a strong advancement program. On all campouts, we have advancement activities for the Scouts. We have Scouts who have achieved with the following Ranks: Life Scouts, Star Scouts, First Class Scout, Second Class Scouts, Tenderfoot Scouts and Scouts.

Scout Camps:  We believe that it is important to go to a traditional Scout camp each year during the summer. These camps are a great place to work on merit badges and on achievements for the lower ranks. On June 28, 2009, we attended our first Summer Camp at The Lost Pines Scout Reservation in Bastrop. The boys enjoyed the experience so much that they voted to attend Lost Pines Summer Camp again in June 2010.  We attended summer camp at Buffalo Trails Scout Reservation in June 2011.  We are planning on attending Winter Camp this December at Lost Pines. Scouts who attend these camps get a big jump on their merit badge work.

Advancement:  Troop 229 has a strong advancement program. On all campouts we work on requirements for advancement in every rank. 

Service:  Service is a big part of Scouting and Troop 229. In our short history, our troop has contributed many hours to service projects. We have been very involved with St. Theresa's and some of the activities that we have participated in are: We helped at the Friday Fish Fry, stuffed and hid Easter eggs for the Parish children’s Easter egg hunt, built the St. Theresa’s Easter Vigil Fire, help with the church’s ministry’s weekend and helped at the Parish Picnic. We participated in the Capitol Area Council Scouting for Food Drive.

Welcome to the Troop 229 Eagle Honor Roll

This page is a work-in-progress and tribute to the outstanding young men that have called Troop 229 home.

                                                 "Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle"

Eagle Scout

    Eagle Date

 Palms

 Palms Date

Ryan W. Miller

    12/06/2011

Silver

 12/09/2012
Joseph Crutcher

    01/03/2012

   
Michael J. Wood     02/28/2012

 Gold

 12/09/2012
Benjamin H. Carsner

 11/13/2012

   

 

 

                                                

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